3Dsound: Draggin' the Line
It's all Fort Collins news to me since July 2007
3Dsound: Draggin' the Line

Garages and barns of Old Town: Speaking their mind on an April afternoon

Fort Collins built environment
Draggin' the line

Garage at 615 Mulberry Street in Old Town, Fort Collins, Colorado – Tuesday, April 22, 2014 615 Mulberry Street in Old Town, Fort Collins, Colorado
Garage at 615 Mulberry Street in Old Town, Fort Collins, Colorado – Tuesday, April 22, 2014628 Mason Street in Old Town, Fort Collins, Colorado
Garage at 411 Myrtle Street in Old Town, Fort Collins, Colorado – Tuesday, April 22, 2014 Garage at 411 Myrtle Street in Old Town, Fort Collins, Colorado – Tuesday, April 22, 2014411 Myrtle Street in Old Town, Fort Collins, Colorado
Garage at 516 Loomis Street in Old Town, Fort Collins, Colorado – Tuesday, April 22, 2014 Garage at 516 Loomis Street in Old Town, Fort Collins, Colorado – Tuesday, April 22, 2014516 Loomis Street in Old Town, Fort Collins, Colorado

Here and gone: EarthCam, Hasui Kawase (川瀬 巴水) and the Japanese cherry trees on the Tidal Basin in Washington, DC

Our nation's capital
Draggin' the line

Japanese cherry trees in blossom on the Tidal Basin in Washington, DC, captured by EarthCam — Thursday, April 10, 2014
Hasui Kawase (川瀬 巴水) — Washington Monument on the Potomac River, 1935
Japanese cherry trees in blossom on the Tidal Basin in Washington, DC, captured by EarthCam — Thursday, April 10, 2014

Behold, thy King cometh unto thee, meek, and sitting upon an ass

Behold, thy King cometh unto thee, meek, and sitting upon an ass (Matthew 21:5)

Shambhala on Friday with my daughter

Personal history
Draggin' the line

Two weeks ago I called up my daughter and asked her to come home for my boss's farewell party, which was scheduled for a week later. My now-former boss is someone who I respect and like a lot. She's a manager who fosters "teammanship" (is that a word?) to deliver outstanding results. She's the one who most often wins awards for top performing team. Also I respect and like my daughter, who I haven't seen in a long time. I wanted my boss and daughter to meet.

My boss's party went well. We all managed to hold back our tears until the ride home, or whenever, and we enjoyed the bowling and pizza. My daughter scored a strike.

Then yesterday my daughter and I visited Shambhala Mountain Center, which is a special place for us, although we hadn't been there for a while.

What makes Shambhala special is its comfortable 45-minute drive to get there. Its spectacular Colorado scenery, which reminds me of how extraordinary my own view is, of the foothills outside of my windows here at home. And of course there's Shambhala's influence on post-1960s American culture, an influence that unfolded as I came of age. Which doesn't mean I can forget the heartbreaking but possibly forgivable sins of Shambhala's excesses. The spirit of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche resides at Shambhala. My daughter describes Shambhala as peaceful. What I know is that I'm drawn there again and again, as my daughter seems to be, too.

Shambhala's attractions include its mash-up of hippie and Tibetan architecture. You'll feel happy as you walk through Shambhala's buildings. The integration of building material, architectural space, Colorado, high-altitude light and the shadow of contemporary cultural history connects your mind, your sensual-craving body (God bless it) and your appreciation of varnish and Himalayan accent-color with a faith that encourages you to embrace your true nature.

Which brings me to the Buddhism. My photo of the statue of the Buddha, below, shows the natural enclosure of rock outcropping where Trungpa Rinpoche first instructed his students in the dharma, along with the statue that's appeared since our last visit, at what was then known as the Rocky Mountain Dharma Center. Not that I know any more about that than what I've read on an interpretive sign, and I haven't taken a class in Shambhala training. My instruction in the dharma comes from Zen, where I learned to count my breath. The reason I keep returning to Shambhala is the palpable presence there of the truth at the end of my nose.

What else's at Shambhala? Don't miss Trungpa Rinpoche's and others' calligraphy. It's not displayed everywhere, but you'll find it, with looking. Although that's not why my daughter and I went to Shambhala this time. We went to place a foot of our present in front of the many feet of our past and to be together, as we enjoyed Shambhala's hippie lunch and circumambulating the stupa.

The Great Stupa of Dharmakaya, at Shambhala, is America's inspiring Buddhist cathedral.

{ single frame comic } Depictions of Jesus: Escape from Wonderland

Escape from Wonderland by Anthony B. Spay He cheweth the cud
Down the rabbit-hole: Anthony B. Spay, Escape from Wonderland, Anthony B. Spay Illustration, online at anthonybspay.com/comics/10/.

{ advertisement } Sony safer than Keith Moon

It's like having Keith Moon in the room. Only Safer.

Random gas fill-Up #03 (March 21, 2014 at Ted's Place)

Random gas fill-up #03 – March 21, 2014 at Ted's Place in Larimer County, Colorado

My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later

Personal history
Draggin' the line

In 1968 my family moved from New Jersey and the New York metropolitan area to Houston, Texas. This happened when I was in seventh-grade. We moved to Houston because my father got a big promotion, which I knew was really big because we stayed in Holiday Inns to get to Houston, rather than camping. Arriving in Houston, we moved into a house that was eye-openingly better than the one we had left behind. My seventh-grade brain thought we'd moved into a mansion.

And that was upward mobility in the 1960s.

Over coffee this morning, I googled the address of our Houston home and discovered it was for sale. You can see the real estate photos below.

Today – a lifetime later – the photos show my parents' landscaping remains in place. The camellias under the living room window still bloom in the spring, sending out their perfume scent. The magnolia to the right has gotten impressively bigger. The pea-gravel walk leads to the street. Hopefully, the caladiums still show their flashy red and green leaves from above the humid undergrowth. But some things have changed. The fig ivy climbing the brick wall is gone, and most of the trees in the front yard (which were the reason the house is set so far back from the street) have been removed. Likewise, all of the trees in the back yard are gone. Otherwise, the landscaping looks like it did when we left. Which makes me wonder why, in half a century, no one has had the imagination to do more with it.

What has changed drastically is the house's aspect. The house's original builder marketed it as a one-and-a-half story English something-or-other. Which by today's standards we recognize as a Thomas Kinkade recreation of an English cottage. I'm not a Kinkade fan (and can hardly believe I'm saying anything even remotely nice about him), but out of respect for the house's design, it does reflect a Midlands pleasantness. Unfortunately, what I see in the recent photos is how the house's owners over the years have successfully homogenized the house's character, inside and out, and re-envisioned the house as a Colonial suburban tract house. (Ripping out the original custom-built cabinets, wall unit and paneling in the process.) Also, for all of the remodeling that's been done, my parents' room remains as dark and only barely liveable as it ever was.

When my mother heard about the house's current selling price she reflected that the house hadn't appreciated much in value. The City-Data website for Harris County, Texas rates the house as being in only fair condition. But also, after we moved out in 1971, the city built a sewage treatment plant down the street, on the other side of the bayou.

My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968
My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968
My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968
My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968
My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968
My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968
My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968 My family's Houston, Texas home, 45 years later in 2014 – West Houston Memorial Drive neighborhood, Nottingham Forest Section Eight subdivision, built in 1968

Fort Collins blogroll and electronic engagement, a moving target worth following

Colorado media
Draggin' the line

I updated my sidebar listing of the blogs published in Fort Collins this afternoon and found myself shaking my head at having only just discovered the blog 365 Things to do in Fort Collins. It's a great blog, steeped in the excitement of living in Northern Colorado. It describes the activities, destinations and fun you can have here, and you ought to check it out. Unfortunately though, "365 Things" ceased publishing three years ago in 2010 at post number 63. I happened to only have found it today for the first time.

And that's the downside of blogging, that the intersection of worthwhile content and the vagaries of search-engine retrieval may mean good stuff goes unnoticed.

365 Things to do in Fort Collins (RIP): Two guys writing about all there is to do in the best place to live on earth

Art Beet Blog: Arts advocacy and information in Fort Collins

Art Palaver (RIP): A blog for artists, about the business of making art in Fort Collins and beyond by Daryle Dickens

Ask Us Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog): He said / She said advice perspectives in Fort Collins

Budding Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog): Removing the propaganda and stereotypes about cannabis in Fort Collins

Cheers Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog): Tapping the latest news and views in Fort Collins

Choice City Native (RIP): Exploring Fort Collins one week at a time

Darren Mahuron Photography: Summit Studios and the (now defunct) Opiate Gallery in Fort Collins

Draggin' the Line by 3Dsound (that's me): It's all Fort Collins news to me since July 2007

Entertaining Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog): Fort Collins arts and entertainment

Faces of Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog) (RIP): Profiles of Fort Collins people on the street

Farming Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog): Fort Collins farming and agriculture

Feasting Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog): Fort Collins food critic Kristin Mastre reviews everything food related

Forgotten Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog): An exploration of Fort Collins history by Meg (of "North of Prospect" and "(usually) Bareboot Meg" fame)

Fresh air Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog): Northern Colorado adventure, information and inspiration

Gardner Path (RIP): Following Cory Gardner's every rotten step

Gary Wockner's Writing & Advocacy: He who cannot howl, will not find his pack in Northern Colorado

GNU: Stream of consciousness blogging by Brandon Manshel of the (now defunct) GNU Experience Gallery in Fort Collins

Growing Up Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog): A parent resource for family activities in Fort Collins

HeidiTown: Reviews of Colorado festivals, travel and more

Jess Clark: Jess Clark's life in on the web: Stuff he's done and stuff he's found in Northern Colorado

Late Night Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog): Bars, bands and adventures in Fort Collins after dark

Lost Fort Collins (RIP): An unofficial exploration of Fort Collins history by Kat

Lost Fort Collins (RIP): An unofficial exploration of Fort Collins history by Terrance Hoaglund

My Built Environment (RIP): Musings and views on the good, bad and really ugly in the Colorado built environment

Nick Armstrong: Fort Collins Dad, entrepreneur, executive producer and small business humorist

NoCo Link: Entertaining and informative television about Northern Colorado

North of Prospect: Meg writes about her life in Old Town, Fort Collins

Notify Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog) (RIP): Insights into politics and government in Fort Collins

Poudre Wilderness Volunteers: Caring for Northern Colorado wilderness

Roadside Mysteries: Life on the Front Range

Save the Poudre: To protect and restore the Cache la Poudre River

Scoop Blog Network (a Scoop Blog Network blog): Behind the scenes at the Scoop Blog Network in Fort Collins

Serving Up Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog): Recipes featuring local Fort Collins ingredients

The Smith Compound: A new home in the West, a haven in thin, dry air

SpokesBUZZ: Amplifying the Colorado music scene

Susan K. Dailey Artist: Fort Collins artist Susan Dailey is best known for her many murals

Tails of Fort Collins (a Scoop Blog Network blog): Information for and about our furry friends in Fort Collins

TEDxCSU: Colorado State University independently organized TED event

TEDxFoCo: Fort Collins independently organized TED event (the one I worked wtih a couple of years back)

TEDxFrontRange: Northern Colorado independently organized TED event

Two Knobby Tires (RIP): A journal of hiking and mountain biking trails in Northern Colorado, Southwestern Virginia and beyond



Colorado media

Note to the Coloradoan about its current Facebook ad

Now, the stories you're following, follow youColorado media
Draggin' the line

Hi Coloradoan, You know that pervy yet Orwellian ad you're running on Facebook, the one that goes, "Now, the stories you're following, follow you"? THAT'S EXACTLY what I don't want from the internets. Try minding your own business. Tell me what's happening in Fort Collins, because that's your value proposition for me, digitally and otherwise.

-3D

{ photograph } Yellow afternoon light on the CSU oval

Fort Collins built environment
Draggin' the line

Yellow afternoon light on the CSU oval – Fort Collins, Colorado – Monday, January 10, 2014 Yellow afternoon light on the CSU oval – Fort Collins, Colorado – Monday, January 10, 2014 Yellow afternoon light on the CSU oval – Fort Collins, Colorado – Monday, January 10, 2014

Garages and barns of Old Town: Garage with a steel frame at 311 North Loomis Street

Fort Collins built environment
Draggin' the line

Garage with a steel frame at 311 Loomis Street in Old Town, Fort Collins, Colorado – Wednesday, January 22, 2014

{ photochop } Depictions of Jesus: As banking industry and corporate profits soar, Democratic Jesus and Republican Jesus duke it out

Depictions of Jesus
Draggin' the line

Democratic Jesus scourges the public square of predatory financial advisers, asset managers and underwriting investment bankers whose year-end bonuses will exceed $91.44 billion in 2013Democratic Jesus scourges the public square of predatory financial advisers, asset managers and underwriting investment bankers whose year-end bonuses will exceed $91.44 billion in 2013. (Rachel Abrams [06-Nov-13], Wall St. bonuses over all are predicted to rise 5 to 10%, New York Times)
Republican Jesus argues in favor of withholding food security from those who can workRepublican Jesus withholds food security from those who are able to work. California Representative Doug LaMalfa fills us in on the hermeneutics, "It always looks good when politicians can go say, we brought a bunch of money to this project here or that project there, standing next to this big, giant blown-up check somewhere and saying, 'look what we did for you.' That's all someone else's money. We should be doing this as individuals, helping the poor." (Arthur Delaney and Jaweed Kaleem [17-May-13], Food stamp cuts spark Bible debate, Huffington Post)

"Tanto Tempo" by Bebel Gilberto

Tanto Temp by Bebel Gilberto (2000)Pop music
Samba through life: Bebel Gilberto (2000), Tanto Tempo, Six Degrees Records.

This is old news, but Tanto Tempo is a perfect album in ways that shouldn't be possible. Bebel Gilberto sings in Portuguese, but we know what she's saying. She's languid but not cloying. She slows it down, even though she's slowed it down already. Her mid-tempo ballads rock more than they swing, although she swings without trying. She doesn't showcase her vocal chops. Her music's produced but intuitive. Her bossa's got its nova intact.



4 Beatles rating 4 Beatles rating



Pop musicCD reviews

Coloradans inconsolable following last night's tragic collision near Hereford in Weld County

Merry Christmas from Thrillsville

Garages and barns of Old Town: Garage with a shingle roof at 211 West Mulberry Street in Fort Collins, Colorado

Fort Collins built environment
Draggin' the line

Garage with a shingle roof at 211 West Mulberry Street in Old Town, Fort Collins, Colorado – Thursday, December 19, 2013

{ illustration } Merry Christmas from Thrillsville

Merry Christmas from Thrillsville


Thanks and mele kalikimaka to Will Viharo.


Christmas

{ political cartoon } An American Spring topples the NRA

On the one year anniversary of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut we should remember that Wayne LaPierre, the executive vice president and CEO of the National Rifle Association, claimed on December 21, 2012 that The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun

{ photochop } Today's the day after the aniversary of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, which means today is "Guns Save Lives" day, when we acknowledge no relationship exists between gun regulation and gun violence

On the one year anniversary of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut we should remember that Wayne LaPierre, the executive vice president and CEO of the National Rifle Association, claimed on December 21, 2012 that The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun

{ political cartoon } Right-action on the 1-year anniversary of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut

On the one year anniversary of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Connecticut we should remember that Wayne LaPierre, the executive vice president and CEO of the National Rifle Association, claimed on December 21, 2012 that The only thing that stops a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun